January 24, 2015

Ednah Meek Cannon - Daughter of James and Anna Cooper Meek

The Children of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

Samuel Meek (great-grandfather) 1824 - 1902
David Cooper Meek (Samuel's twin) 1824 - 1901
Enoch Meek #1 1825 - 1901
                     Hiram   1826/7 - 1909  (Elizabeth's twin)
Elizabeth  1826/7 -1907 
Seth     1827 - 1845
Sidnah  1830 - 1872
James  1833 - 1865
*Ednah  1834 - 1910
John W. 1836 - ?
Beulah  1837 - 1912
Enoch #2   1840 - 1864
Solomon  1842 - 1917

What a sad tale is the life of Ednah Meek Cannon!
Ednah (Edna), the third daughter of James and Anna Meek, was born January 13, 1834, in Beaver, Pennsylvania.  The marriage records of Columbiana County, Ohio, listed the marriage of Ednah Meek to George W. Cannon:

"The State of Ohio, Columbiana County.  I certify that on the 28th day of June 1860, Mr. George W. Cannon and wife, Ednah Meek, were by me legally joined in marriage.  Benjamin Taylor. Justice of the Peace."

Just a month before, the Republican Convention had chosen Abraham Lincoln as its presidential candidate, and the country was alive over the issue of slavery.

Ednah and George settled somewhere in the corner of Mahoning and Stark counties.  It is likely that the county borders shifted over time as the censuses put them in Mahoning County, but Ednah's obituary stated that she spent most of her married life in Stark County and their children were buried in Stark County.
  In June 1863, George, a resident of Smith Township, Mahoning County, registered for the Civil War draft.  He reported that he was 28 years old, married and a laborer. The record did not indicate that he was drafted or paid a substitute for service.

The Federal Census of 1870 found the couple still in the Smith Township location.  George, 36, was working as a railroad hand and owned real estate worth $1200.  Ednah was 33, keeping house, with their two children, Laura B. 6, and Lillie M., 3.  The couple had already lost two sons: Thomas S. Cannon, on April 22, 1863, aged 1 year, 10 months and 7 days old, and an unnamed infant son on April 3, 1867 at the age of 3 days.  And in just a few years, on December 13, 1872, their daughter, Lillie, would pass away at the age of 5 years, 8 months and 12 days.  All of these children were buried in the West Beech Cemetery in Stark County, Ohio.  What a tragedy for this family!

The year 1880 found the Cannon family in Leetonia, Salem Township, Columbiana County, Ohio, on June 22, 1880, when the census was taken.  George was 45 and working as an engineer, perhaps on the railroad.  The children listed were Laura B., 15, and George G. (George Gideon), 7.  

George W. Cannon died in 1880 and if this were not enough heartache, another tragedy struck Ednah just a year later on August 31, 1881, when their son, George, died at about the age of 8.  We also know from Ednah's obituary that the last living child, Laura, died in about 1885 at the age of 20.  George, the son, was also buried at the West Beech Cemetery, but I could not find Laura's or her father's tombstones there.

So, by about 1885, all of Ednah's family was gone!  She was alone.  According to her obituary, a few months after her husband's death, she moved to Hicksville, Ohio, where so many of her other siblings had settled. First she and her only daughter must have lived with Solomon, but soon a house was purchased in Hicksville and it is there, in the 1900 census, Ednah is found living with her youngest brother, Solomon.  Edna M. Cannon was 66 at that time, a widow, who listed herself as a landlady.  She did own the home in which they lived and she was listed as head of the family.  Solomon was single, 57, and working fairly steadily as a day laborer.  He reported only two months that year when he was not employed.

By 1910, the tables were turned and Solomon was listed in the census as the head of household at the house on Edgerton Street.  Solomon, 67, and Edna Cannon, 76, reported they had their own income. Sadly, just a few months after the census was taken, Edna died on September 21, 1910.  Her obituary suggested that perhaps all her life struggles had left her a rather embittered, eccentric woman.

(The above clipping is so blurred that I have transcribed it here:
Ednah, daughter of James and Edna Meek,was born in Pennsylvania January 13, 1834.  She was married to Geo. Cannon in 1861, in eastern Ohio, and died in Hicksville, September 21, 1910, aged 76 years, 8 months, 8 days.  She was one of 14 children, 10 sons and 4 daughters. Only two survive, a sister, Mrs. Beulah Sensenbacher and a brother, Solomon Meek.  When Mrs. Cannon was in tender years, her parents moved from Pennsylvania to Columbiana Co., O.  Her married life was lived in Stark county, Ohio.
There her five children were born and there they all died, 4 of them while very young, one only, living until 20 years old.  The loss of her(e) children was a sorrow that never left her heart, and at times, it almost caused her to fight against Providence and it embittered her life somewhat.  Her husband died 21 years ago, and a few months afterward, she came to this county, residing with her brother, Solomon, on the farm for 4 years, and then they came to Hicksville which has been their home since.
She was a suffer(er) for a number of years.  These sufferings together with her sorrows through life, and the effect heredity and environment have upon one, had much to do with the life she lived and the temperment she possessed.  Many of Mrs. Cannon's neighbors testify that she was a kind and accommodating neighbor and that she had a warm place in their hearts and that they were glad to administer as she had need.
Mrs. Cannon became a member of the church many years ago. Before her health failed, she was frequently at services, but a number of years she did not feel able to go.  She had her peculiarities, almost eccentricities, but the Lord knew them all and He alone is able to put the proper value on every life.  During her last weeks she turned her thoughts more upon the state of her soul and the future life.  She liked to have Christian prayer and song and scripture in her presence.  While she was gradually failing, some were surprised she went so quickly.  The funeral in charge of her pastor, Rev. Heims, was held in the Methodist church Friday morning, Sept. 28, 1910.") 

I looked long and hard for Edna's burial place, but after reading the article below, I had the clue I needed to find it. In the Hicksville Tribune, September 22, 1910:
 Edna Meek Cannon is buried in Lindenwood Cemetery, Fort Wayne, Indiana.

January 18, 2015

Sidnah Meek Garrett - Daughter of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

The Children of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

Samuel Meek (great-grandfather) 1824 - 1902
David Cooper Meek (Samuel's twin) 1824 - 1901
Enoch Meek #1 1825 - 1901
                     Hiram   1826/7 - 1909  (Elizabeth's twin)
Elizabeth  1826/7 -1907 
Seth     1827 - 1845
*Sidnah  1830 - 1872
James  1833 - 1865
Ednah  1834 - 1910
John W. 1836 - ?
Beulah  1837 - 1912
Enoch #2   1840 - 1864
Solomon  1842 - 1917
Sidnah Jane Meek was born about 1830 in Columbiana County, Ohio.  
Hugh Eaton Garrett and Sidnah J. Meek married on November 23, 1854.  In the 1860 census, the couple resided in East Palestine, Unity Township, Columbiana County. Hugh was a carpenter and the family then included two children - James M. Meek, 4, and Cooper Meek, 1.  (James Meek Garrett and Cooper Sidney Garrett)

In the 1870 census, the family was enumerated as McGarrett. Hugh was 40 and Sidnah (enumerated Sidney) was 38.  The family had expanded to five children:
James -14, Cooper -11, Sherman -9, Sissie (Elizabeth, Lizzie) - 5, and D. Frank, 4 (David Frank). Hugh was a sawyer, one who saws wood.  Their real estate was valued at $800 and no value was given to their personal goods.




Sadly, just two years later, on February 1, 1872, Sidnah Meek Garrett died. She was buried in East Palestine in the Glenview Cemetery.  Later, her oldest son, James would be buried with her.  James' wife, Ida Elser Garrett is also buried nearby.
Hugh, left with five children, sent at least two, little Sissie and David Frank to live with Sidnah's sister, Elizabeth Meek Goodin in Defiance County. They will appear on the census there.  Sidnah died in February and by October of that same year, 1872, Hugh remarried to Almira Dawes on October 15, who also lived in Columbiana County.  Almira and Hugh made their home in Leetonia and had four children together: Horace (born Sept. 1873), Jessie (born February 1875), Charles (born January 1877) and Rosa Rita (born December 1879).

Hugh Garrett died in 1890 at the age of 62, still working as a carpenter.  His second wife, Almira, lived another 32 years, until 1922, when she died at the age of 82.

As for the children of Sidnah and Hugh, James Meek Garrett spent his adulthood in Pennsylvania where he worked on the railroad as both a brakeman and a baggage master.  He outlived his wife and his two children.
Cooper Sidney Garrett moved to the Oregon Territory and lived there and in Washington state, working as a bookkeeper and eventually trying his hand at growing fruit. He and his wife Rosa Townsend had several children.
It is known only that Sherman Garrett died in 1914.
Elizabeth Garrett also went west to Washington with her husband Thomas Goff after marrying in Columbiana County.  Thomas  worked on the railroad. Lizzie died in 1920, with no children.
David Frank Garrett, known as Frank, went west where he married Alice Rachel Atkins in Nebraska.  They moved to Kansas where he was co-owner of a business, the Cronk and Garrett General Store.  They had three children, one of whom survived beyond childbirth.

**I met Shannon on Ancestry and she contributed much to the above research.  Thanks, Shannon!

 

January 12, 2015

Elizabeth Meek Goodin - Daughter of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

The Children of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

Samuel Meek (great-grandfather) 1824 - 1902
*David Cooper Meek (Samuel's twin) 1824 - 1901
Enoch Meek #1 1825 - 1901
                     Hiram   1826/7 - 1909  (Elizabeth's twin)
*Elizabeth  1826/7 - 1907 
Seth     1827 - 1845
Sidnah  1830 - 1872
James  1833 - 1865
Ednah  1834 - 1910
John W. 1836 - ?
Beulah  1837 - 1912
Enoch #2   1840 - 1864
Solomon  1842 - 1917

Elizabeth Meek was born during the time her parents lived in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, on August 6, 1827.  According to her obituary, the family moved back to Columbiana County, Ohio, when she was about 7 years old.  She is shown in the census, staying at home with her widowed mother until her mother died, after which she moved with her brother, Solomon, to Defiance County, Ohio, to join the other siblings who had moved there.  After their sister, Sidnah, died in 1872, Elizabeth and Solomon cared for Sidnah's two younger children, Lizzie and Frank.

On October 13, 1878, at the age of 49, Elizabeth married Addison Goodin in Hicksville.  Addison was shown in the 1870 census with his first wife, Jane, and his occupation was listed as Grocery, Ret.  Retired?  Well, hardly, as the entrepeneur in Addison was always looking for a business.  The Hicksville papers trace his ventures.
Elizabeth and Addison, by the 1880 census, had taken in Lizzie and Frank Garrett to raise.  A. Goodin, 62, hardware merchant and Elisebeth Goodin, Keeping House, had with them Frank Garrett, 12, and Lizzie Garrett, 15, both attending school.

On February 23, 1882, Addison was in business with his uncle, Wesley Batchelor, in Hicksville, according to the Tribune.
Addison went out on his own and by April 6, 1882, these ads were appearing in the local paper.
 Always looking for a new venture, Addison thought he saw bright prospects in moving out west to Kansas.  The local paper reported his trip on December 11, 1884.

Frank would have been about 19 when he also went off to Kansas to seek his fortune.
By January of 1886, Addison was ready to move to Kansas by selling all his property in Ohio.  

BUT...did he sell and leave Hicksville?
On April 22, 1886, an article appeared in the paper, claiming that Addison was in a new partnership in Hicksville. 
So, more research will need to be done to see if Addison and Elizabeth remained in Hicksville!  Or if they went to Kansas briefly and things just didn't work out.

In 1889, when Sidnah's daughter, Lizzie, was 24, a notice appeared in the newspaper that she was visiting out west.
Lizzie's older brother, Cooper Meek, was in Montana at that time, according to the census.  He lived in Flathead, Columbia County, where he worked as a bookkeeper.  He and his wife had two children at that time, James Hugh and Ethel A.  

By 1900, Addison and Elizabeth were elderly and living on Smith Street in Hicksville...which made me think that they did not get it sold years back.  Married 59 years with no children of their own, Addison was 82 and Elizabeth, 72.

In 1904, Addison died at 86.  Elizabeth eventually went into a facility for the elderly in Indiana where she passed away in 1907.  Her obituary appeared in a collection of Northwest Ohio Pioneer Obituaries and was published in the paper on 
April 11, 1907.

January 4, 2015

Hiram Meek - His Pension Record

Hiram Meek was a patriot and soldier who served
twice during the Civil War, once as a Second Lieutenant in Company D, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry.  He resigned after several years in January 1864, due to his health.  Then we went back again in March of 1865, first as a recruiter and then as a Captain in Company D of the 195th O.V. I. 

A Civil War soldier or his widow or even a dependent mother or father could apply for a pension.  The pension laws became liberalized over time, so an applicant could keep requesting more money, depending on what claims he made. From Hiram's pension file, obtained from the National Archives, it appeared that his first pension was $3.75 a month, based on his resignation due to poor health in 1864.  He claimed chronic diarrhea or dysentry, which was a very, very common complaint among all the soldiers.


In the Disability Act of 1890, the government granted pensions to any soldier or sailor (Union) who had served 90 days and was now incapacitated for manual labor, to the point where he could not support himself.  If a man could prove this, he would be allowed an extra pension of $6 - $12 a month.  One source noted that pensioners increased from 300,000 in 1885 to over a million by 1893, stressing the government's budget, and allowing fraud to enter the process.  In 1894, it was required that extensive testimony be given from neighbors, employers, or fellow soldiers in proof of a claimant's disability and the fact that it was a result as his service as a soldier. 

Hiram Meek's file is a wealth of affadavits and depositions, hoping to prove that he obtained a hernia/ rupture while serving in Kentucky and because of that, he could not do manual labor.  He began the process as early as 1892, and by December 1895, the government began the process of interviewing people Hiram knew. He had paid a lawyer, F. M. Thompson, to file his claim at a $2.00 cost, and Hiram wanted only Hiram Hootman interviewed because they had served together in the war and had shared a tent.  E. W. Pierce, the Special Examiner from the Pension Office, did not like that idea, however, and proceeded to interview at least ten other acquaintances.

The whole process began with Hiram Meek's deposition to Mr. Pierce on October 24, 1895. Some pages seem to be missing, but to hear his voice tell his own story was wonderful, so I present it here:
  
"I am 68 years old and my residence and P. O. address is Hicksville, Ohio.  I am the same Hiram Meek who served in Co. F 111th O.V.I. from Aug. '62 to Jan. '64.  I resigned on account of being unable for duty on account of chronic diarrhea for which I am pensioned at $6.00 per mo.  I am also claimant for pension on account of rupture of left side which I incurred late in the fall, Nov. or Dec. '62 when the Co. was at Fort Baker near Bowling Green, Ky. the first winter we were out.

For five years before I went in the service, I lived five miles N.E. of HIcksville, Defiance Co., O. on a farm.  I was 37 years old when I went in the service. I had lived in that neighborhood seven or eight years.  Before that I was a single man knocking around from place to place- was four years in California.  Made my home at East Palestine, Columbiana Co., O. just before coming here.  I do not remember that I ever had an accident happen to me before the service.  I was never injured about the groin or the lower part of the abdomen in any way.  I never had anything like a rupture before I went in the service.  I did not know what a rupture was.  Had never seen one before the service.

Prior -Frederick...no, Joseph Miller knew me well before I went in the service. The men who knew me most intimately are dead.  Philip Miller lived a half mile from me and I changed works with him a good deal.  He is dead.  John Lawson was another near neighbor. He is dead.  Amos Forlow is living and he knew me well and lived less than a half a mile from me. Also John L. Ginter, Chesaning, Saginaw Co., Mich. and William Crow, 6 1/2 miles N.E. here. These are all I can think of who knew me intimately before I went in the service.
Robert Chaiss, Unity, Columbiana Co., Ohio, knew me well while I lived there - worked for him some.  I can not remember anyone else there except an Aunt Agnes Meek, East Palestine, Columbiana Co., Ohio and Samuel Eaton of some place, a cousin.

In service-
The regiment spent the first winter we were out at Bowling Green, Ky.  Our Co. was detached and located at Fort Baker two or three miles from town.  My rupture, left side, came on me in the following manner.  I had a bad cold and cough and I was taking a sweat to break it up, had gone to bed and was covered up as closely as I could.  Thereafter I had gone to sleep, a citizen came into the fort and reported some spies in his neighborhood about seven miles from the fort.  The noise he made with the men talking waked me up.  I was sweating freely.  The Capt. was away from the Co.  The First Lieut. said he couldn't go and I felt it was my duty and raised up in bed and said, "I'll go."  So I dressed myself as warmly as I could and with a detail of eight men and a Sergt. went out with the citizen as a guide and captured the spies and brought them back to camp.  We left the fort about midnight and got back about daylight.  It was a cold night and snow on the ground - one of the coldish nights I experienced in Kentucky.

As a result of the experience, I took more cold and I had a terrible cough.  It seemed as if I would cough my lungs out.  It lasted about a week.  I got very sore across the lower part of my abdomen and a lump as large as a hickory nut with the shuck off came where this rupture is now.  I didn't know what it was until Hiram Hootman of my Co. saw me dressing one morning and called my attention to it, and told me it was a rupture.  It was on the left side exactly where it is now.   The other Lieut. Callender, is dead.  I do not know that any one but Hiram Hootman saw this rupture in service.  It did not bother me so much after my cough got better.  I could not wear my sword belt around me without being in misery and I only wore my sword belt after that when it was absolutely necessary on dress parade or something of that kind.  This fact would be known to most anyone in the Co.  I did not wear a truss in service.  
I do not remember as First Lieut. John W. Cleland.  That must be a mistake. Johnson O. Took was made a 2nd Lieut. after I left the Co.  The Ex'r made a mistaking in calling for list of comrades in this case - giving date of discharge as Dec. 18, '65 from F 111th OVI when correct date is Jan. 16, '64.  Dec.'65 was date of discharge from second service and no list of comrades from second service is with the case.

I bunked with Capt. John E. Hill and Lieut. Callender. Callender is dead.  Hill was state treasurer of Nebraska, P. O. Omaha, I think.  He was a defaulter, I think, in that office, and I understand his testimony in that office is not accepted by the Department.  Serts. Beebe and Sweet might know something about it though I did not complain of it much.  See Jonas Miller, Hicksville, O., Hiram Rice, Farmer, O. & E. E. Hall, Hicksville, O.

After resigning from Co. F. 111 OVI I came back to my farm here in Defiance Co., O. and worked on the farm, where I was able to work until I went out in Co. D. 195th OVI in Mch. '65.  I had partially recovered my health and thought I could stand it again.  My rupture did not get any worse and did not give me any pain unless I lifted.  I did not wear a truss - did not consult a doctor about it - did not show it to anyone that I remember.  My wife is not living.  The hardest service I had in the 195 OVI was the marching.  I was Capt. of the Co. and being Capt. had opportunities to take good care of myself and did.  I did not know a man in the Co. until I made their acquaintance officially.  The men who slept in my tent were 2nd Lieut. H. H. Peppard, W. Unity, Williams Co., O. and First Lieut. H. B. Taylor who was in Toledo, O. the last I heard of him.  They would be the only ones in the Co. who would know anything about it and I do not know whether they would or not.  I do not remember whether I called their attention to my rupture or not.  It kept about the same size during my service in the 195th OVI.

After I came home from my service in 195th Regt. the next spring, I went to Dr. Kinmont of this place and he told me by all means to get a truss and put it on which I did and I haven't been a day without a truss since there.  I have heard the above read over and my answers are correctly recorded."  Hiram Meek"

Advertisement found that shows the truss that might have been used by Hiram




So Mr. Pierce, the government examiner, began his work interviewing witnesses and taking their depositions.  Between December 9 and December 13, 1895, he took the statements of H. H. Peppard, Alice Fritz, Samuel K. Fritz, Hiram F. Rice, Wm. H. Crow, Amos Forlow, Edwin E. Hale, C. R. Curtiss and Hiram C. Hootman.  He also spoke to Christopher Mierly, John Sleesman, F. H. Horton, Enoch Randall, Emanuel Byers and Wm. Roan, but decided that they had no knowledge to add to the case. In addition, he had testimony and a complete health history of Hiram from Dr. Rakestraw and Dr. Kinmont from Hicksville.  Mr. Pierce also noted that Hiram was a man of excellent reputation and he was "universally well spoken of in the community."  

Hiram Hootman's testimony was positive for Hiram Meek

Pierce rated the witnesses from Excellent to Not Good.  A few soldiers remembered that it hurt Hiram to wear his sword belt so he carried it over his shoulders and that he had complained of a rupture.  Some of the neighbors testified that they knew he couldn't work for long periods at a time or that he often put his hands in his pants to push down on his abdomen. Others knew nothing of a rupture. One set of neighbors seemed biased against Hiram, so they were rated as poor witnesses. 
Pierce put all these together and submitted them to the Commissioner of Pensions. The request was put under investigation

At one point during this process, Hiram went out to Wayne, Nebraska, to stay with his daughter Ella Meek Pile.  While there, he was granted $20 a month, total disability, under the Act of February 6, 1907, due to his old age.  He did not reap this for long, however, as he died in 1909.

Last pension given to Hiram Meek.  His daughter, Ella Pile was his witness in Nebraska.

Often a pension record provides so much information beyond the military.  In this record, Hiram reported the names of all his children (of which Fred is not one) and their dates of birth.  A marriage record was included and names of his neighbors and where they lived in relation to him.  His complete health history was there, along with a description of him at 6', 185 lbs.  A pension record for your ancestor can be well worth obtaining, not just for the story it may tell, but for the additional genealogical information that may reside there.



 
















December 30, 2014

Hiram Meek - Son of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

The Children of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

Samuel Meek (great-grandfather) 1824 - 1902
David Cooper Meek (Samuel's twin) 1824 - 1901
Enoch Meek #1 1825 - 1901
                    * Hiram   1826/7 - 1909  (Elizabeth's twin)
Elizabeth  1826/7 -1907 
Seth     1827 - 1845
Sidnah  1830 - 1872
James  1833 - 1865
Ednah  1834 - 1910
John W. 1836 - ?
Beulah  1837 - 1912
Enoch #2   1840 - 1864
Solomon  1842 - 1917
"You definitely do not descend from a colorless character, " one fellow Meek researcher commented, referring to my husband's great-great uncle, Hiram Meek of Mark Township, Defiance County, Ohio.  Born in Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, the son of James and Anna Meek, on August 6, 1827, Hiram was one of fourteen children.  The early years of his life were spent with his family in Columbiana County, Ohio.

When Hiram was about 22, he decided to try his luck in the gold fields of California.  One of his obituaries stated, 
"In 1849, he joined an overland party to California in search of gold.  He remained in the west 4 years, returning to Ohio by way of the Isthmus of Panama."
So he was one of the forty-niners, lured out West by the promise of quick wealth in the gold fields. Perhaps he went with David Cooper Meek, his brother.  Even though he was gone during the 1850 census, he was enumerated with his mother and siblings in Unity Township, Columbiana County.  The enumerators were directed to list "...the name of every person whose usual place of abode on the first day of June 1850, was in this family...including names of those temporarily absent on a visit, journey, or a voyage..."

Upon his return, he married Mary Usk Batchelor, an immigrant from England.  They married in Jennings County, Indiana on November 12, 1856.  Eventually, the family settled in Mark Township, Defiance County, Ohio, on a farm in Section 7 that would be 180 acres by 1890.  In the 1860 census, Mary and Hiram had two small children: O'ella, 2, and Seth, 1.  Hiram, 32, and Mary, (who was born at sea), 30, had real estate worth $2000 at that time and personal goods worth $200.

When the Civil War broke out, the young farmer enlisted as part of Company F, 111th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. His pension file held his own account of his troop's movements:

I enlisted in the U. S. Army August 13, 1862, and was mustered into the U. S. service as Second Lieut., Company F, 111th O.V.I. at Toledo, Ohio, September 5, 1862.  We left Toledo on the 7th and arrived at Covington, Ky. the 9th.  Left Covington about the 20th and arrived at Louisville about the 23rd.  Left Louisville about Oct. 1 and went to Shelbyville and from there to Frankfort.  From Frankfort to Crab Orchard by way of Lawrenceburg.  We arrived at Crab Orchard the next morning from the Perryville fight.  We left Crab Orchard for Bowling Green, Ky. and arrived there about the first of November '62.  Remained in Bowling Green doing post duty until near the last of June."


During his time at Bowling Green, Hiram was involved in the capture of three spies that were reported to the Army by some townspeople.  An injury that occurred at the time of this incident became the basis for an appeal for a greater pension later on in his career.  In a pension deposition, Hiram described the event at Bowling Green:

"In the fall of 1862, about the last of November while we were quartered at Fort Baker near Bowling Green, state of Kentucky, I contracted a severe cold and one evening I had taken a sweat and gone to bed expecting to get up in the morning feeling better.  But about midnight, a citizen came in and reported 3 spies located about 8 miles in the country.  The duty fell to me to try and capture them.  I got up all wet with sweat and dressed as warm as I can and made a detail of eight or nine men an went.  It was quite cold and frosty with a light snow on the ground.  I done the best I could to keep warm but was considerably chilled & came back with my prisoners and a worse cold than I had before which settled in my throat and lungs causing me to have a severe cough which I could not control.  I coughed so hard that it produced a hernia on which I claim a pension, at first it did not seem to amount to much although it was very painful..."

Hiram continued with his company, however, from Bowling Green, traveling eventually back to Cincinnati, Ohio, where his company patrolled the Ohio River to prevent Morgan of the Confederates from crossing.  About August 1, 1863, the company was moved to a camp near Lebanon, Kentucky, where they drilled and equipped themselves for a campaign through Tennessee. On August 20, Meek recounted that the group began their march over the mountains and across the Cumberland River, reaching Louden, Tennessee, about September 1, and remaining there until driven back by Longstreet in November.  Eventually, Hiram resigned his Second Lt. position and was discharged from the 111th on June 16, 1864, because of severe diarrhea, a condition shared by many of his company.

Hiram wrote, "It was in January (1864) after the siege of Knoxville, my health became so poor...I tendered my resignation and was sent home."  There he remained until March of 1865 "when I felt I had recovered my health sufficiently to stand another campaign."   So, leaving a wife and now four children behind, he was sent to Toledo to help in recruiting men for Col. Moses R. Brailey. There Meek's patriotism took over again and not satisfied with the recruiting position, he accepted a position as commander of Company D of the 195th O.V.I. as Captain.  He was with this group through Virginia, arriving at Alexandria in July 1865, where they did provost duty until mustered out of service in December 1865.  He was 38 years old and had seen a great deal of life...and death...already.

By the 1870 census, Hiram, 42, was back in Mark Township with his greatly expanded family, including wife, Mary, 39, and children: Oella, 12; Seth, 11; James P., 9; Kate, 6; Maud, 3; Carrie, 2; and Sarah A., 5 months.  The value of his real estate had grown to $4000 and his personal effects to $1650. In 1876, young James P. Meek would die on January 24th at the age of 14 years, 6 months and 28 days.

By the 1880 enumeration, one more son would be added - Ulysses Sidney Grant Meek - born when Hiram was about 52.  This son would be known by "Grant" - what a significant name bestowed on him by Hiram and Mary.  Mary's father, James, a widower and 76, lived with them in 1880, as well.

Hiram's name appeared often in the newspapers of the day as he was an active citizen, serving on county juries, working in the Agricultural Society, and on the township road committee.  In 1882, his father-in-law died, as noted in the Defiance Democrat on April 20, 1882:
"Mr. Bachelor, father of Wesley Bachelor, died at the residence of Hiram Meek, in Mark township, on Monday last, at an advanced age."

In 1885, Hiram lost his beloved wife, Mary Usk Batchelor Meek.  She and later, he, were buried at Forest Home Cemetery in Hicksville, Ohio.  This bit of information about Mary was found on www.findagrave.com:
 
"Mary Usk Batchelor was the daughter of James and Sarah Cogswell Batchelor. Her middle name stems from the custom of naming any baby born during a voyage to be named after the ship. She was born aboard the USK on the Atlantic Ocean on 1 Oct 1831."

The above article goes on to mention Fred as one of the sons of Hiram and Mary, but I have not come across him in the censuses or birth records.  Hiram's obituary mentioned that he had three sons -James P., Seth, and Grant- and five daughters - O'Ella (Ella), Catherine (Kate), Mary Alice (Carrie), Maud and Sarah Anna.  So Fred remains a mystery.

By the 1900 census, an elderly Hiram lived with his daughter, Maud, and her husband, Thomas D. Hood.  The couple had two young children, John H. and Ella, ages 3 and 2.  With Hiram, listed as a boarder, was Ella Meek, single, 40, a boarder, as well. Was Ella misnamed in the census?  His daughter, Ella, was married and in Nebraska. Could this have been Kate instead?  A mystery.

On October 14, 1909, Hiram Meek passed away at the age of 82 years 2 months and 8 days.  An adventurous, patriotic man came to his rest.



 Another obituary in the Hicksville Tribune, on October 21, 1909

"On Thursday evening at an early hour, Hiram Meek, a pioneer resident of this neighborhood and prominent citizen passed into the great beyond after a lingering illness...
In his young manhood he took to wife Mary Batchelor, and to them were born 8 children, 3 sons and 5 daughters.  Of these one son and the mother preceded him in death, the wife and mother about 27 years ago.  Those surviving are Seth Meek, Anna Meek, Kate Meek, Mrs. Pyle, Mrs. T. D. Hood, Mrs. Carrie Hunton.  
When the Civil War broke out, deceased organized Co. F of the 111th O.V.I. and went out as second Lieutenant in that company.  He afterwards was made a captain and served near Washington until the war closed, leaving the service a brevet Major.
He was a forty-niner, crossing the plains in the search of gold and coming home by way of the Ithmus of Panama.  In addition to the survivors of his immediate family, he leaves a brother, Saml. Meek and two sisters, Mrs. Edna Cannon and Mrs. John Sensabacher.  Funeral services were held Monday afternoon from the Disciple Church.  Interment in Forest Home."



  

December 22, 2014

James, Enoch and Seth Meek - Sons of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

The Children of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

Samuel Meek (great-grandfather) 1824 - 1902
David Cooper Meek (Samuel's twin) 1824 - 1901
Enoch Meek #1 1825 - 1901
                     Hiram   1826/7 - 1909  (Elizabeth's twin)
Elizabeth  1826/7 -1907 
*Seth     1827 - 1845
Sidnah  1830 - 1872
*James  1833 - 1865
Ednah  1834 - 1910
John W. 1836 - ?
Beulah  1837 - 1912
*Enoch #2   1840 - 1864
Solomon  1842 - 1917

James and Anna Meek knew well how it felt to lose a child.  Around 1825, they had a son named Enoch, and he died around 1837 at the age of 13.  They buried this son in the Boatman Cemetery, East Palestine Township, Columbiana County, Ohio.
Through the years, other sons would join Enoch there, including young Seth, who was only 19 at his death in 1845.
Enoch Meek #1


Seth Meek
 Years after the first Enoch's death, another son was born to James and Anna and, as was somewhat typical of the times, they named this son Enoch, as well.   Born about 1840, this Enoch Meek would enlist as a Union soldier, along with two of his brothers. 
 In Enoch's records that were obtained from the National Archives, we learn that Enoch enlisted in Company D, 100th Ohio Infantry at Toledo and was mustered in on September 1, 1862, for three years or the duration of the war.  Of great interest was the personal description provided of a 22 year old male, 5' 11 3/4", of fair complexion with blue eyes and dark hair, and "by occupation, a farmer."

Enoch mustered in as a Private, but was eventually promoted to Corporal on April 20, 1864, serving under First Lieutenant A. R. Tate in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Georgia.  In 1864, his group was ordered to assault the enemy at 6 a.m. on August 5th near Utoy Creek, Georgia on the way to Atlanta.  They captured 140 Confederate prisoners.  During that night, they worked at felling trees along the creek and in the morning, the Union advanced again, using the timber for some protection.  However, the fallen trees also created barriers for troop movement as many logs were intertwined as they fell.  The men struggled there, while the Confederates kept up their fire.  Eventually, the Confederates turned back, but by that time, Enoch was a casualty of the battle.  He was killed in action on August 6, 1864.  

The History of Columbiana County, Ohio, in an extensive sketch of Captain Robert Taggart, stated: "Enoch Meek, a favorite pupil of Captain Taggart, was killed in the charge of the brigade at Utoy Creek in the vicinity of Utoy, Georgia."  Enoch was probably buried at the scene of the battle, as it was noted in the cemetery records of Boatman Cemetery that Enoch's body was not there, but a monument stands to him.
 

 Just a year later, the Meek family would again know loss.  Enoch's brother, James, enlisted on August 11, 1862 and also probably mustered in in September.  
He served in Company C of the 104th Ohio, enlisting also for three years or the war.  James was wounded in the engagement at Town Creek, North Carolina on February 20, 1865 and died of his wounds on March 17, 1865 in Baltimore, Maryland, probably in a military hospital there.







Town Creek, near the Cape Fear River, in North Carolina, was near Fort Anderson.  The Union marched toward Fort Anderson in February, 1865, with a detachment of the 104th Ohio skirmishing on the road leading to the fort.  The Confederates evacuated the fort during the night, but made  stand with fortifications and three pieces of artillery to command the approach to the bridge.  The Union managed to cross two brigades over on a flat boat about a mile from the bridge and they flanked the enemy.  Sixty one soldiers were wounded, and James Meek was one of them.  Wounded on February 20, 1865, he died of his wounds on March 16, 1865, in Baltimore, Maryland, probably at a hospital there.  

James is buried near his parents and grandparents, and Enoch's marker in Boatman Cemetery, East Palestine, Columbiana County.  James was 32 years old.


























**I mistakenly sent for and received the pension record of a different James Meek of Columbiana County.  This soldier died in Andersonville and his file was quite extensive as father and later, his stepmother, tried to collect his pension.  The problem was that this James Meek had William Meek as a father, rather than James.  Sometime I will post this story as it is a good one.

December 19, 2014

David Cooper Meek - Son of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek

The Children of James and Anna (Cooper) Meek
Samuel Meek (great-grandfather) 1824 - 1902
*David Cooper Meek (Samuel's twin) 1824 - 1901
Enoch Meek #1 1825 - 1901
Hiram   1826/7 - 1909
Elizabeth  1826/7 -1907
Seth     1827 - 1845
Sidnah  1830 - 1872
James  1833 - 1865
Ednah  1834 - 1910
John W. 1836 - ?
Beulah  1837 - 1912
Enoch #2   1840 - 1864
Solomon  1842 - 1917


Great-grandfather, Samuel Meek, named after his grandfather, had a twin brother who was named David Cooper Meek.  Cooper was his mother's maiden name.  Most sources agree that the boys were born on January 1, 1824, in Unity Township, Columbiana County, Ohio.

A sketch about David's life appeared in the book, Commemorative Biographical Record of Northwestern Ohio (Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co., 1899), page 269-270. 

"DAVID C. MEEK
This worthy representative of the agricultural interests of Hicksville township, Defiance county, owns a good farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Section 12, which has been transformed by him into a highly-cultivated tract.  He is one of Ohio's native sons, having been born in Columbiana county, January 1, 1824.  His parents were James and Ann (Cooper) Meek, the former probably a native of Ohio, born in 1801, the latter of Pennsylvania, born in 1798.  Both died in Columbiana county, this State, the father in 1845, the mother in 1873 or 1874.

David C. Meek and his twin brother, Samuel Meek, of Hicksville township, were the eldest in a family of fourteen children, and were three years of age when the family removed from Columbiana county to Beaver county, Pennsylvania.  After seven years spent in that State, however, they returned to Columbiana county, where our subject grew to manhood, remaining upon the home farm until he had attained his twenty-second year.  Two years later, he went to California, where he successfully engaged in mining for four years, and soon after his return to Ohio, he purchased his present farm in Section 12, Hicksville township, Defiance county.  He did not remain long in the East, however, returning to California at the end of a year.  This time he spent twelve years on the Pacific slope, and met with fair success in his mining operations.  Since then he has made his home uninterruptedly upon his present farm, and to its development and improvement he has devoted his energies, erecting thereon good and substantial buildings.

In Hicksville, township, on June 22, 1871, Mr. Meek was married to Miss Nancy Jane Beltz, who was born in Crawford county, Ohio, December 15, 1852, and is the second in order of birth in a family of five children.  Her parents, William W. and Mary A. (Good) Beltz, were natives of Pennsylvania, whence in the early 'sixties' they came to Defiance county, Ohio, locating in Hicksville township, where they both died, the father in 1874 at the age of forty-seven years, the mother in 1894, when sixty-five years.  

To Mr. and Mrs. Meek have been born three children:  Eva A., who died at the age of six months; Clement O. (Orlando), born July 23, 1873; and David C., born December 22, 1884.  Of these, Clement was married August 31, 1897, to Lillie Barrows, and they have one child, Laura Beatrice Meek, born June 8, 1898.  Clement and his father are both Republican in politics.

Samuel Meek, the great-grandfather of our subject, was of Irish descent; his wife reached the patriarchal age of ninety-nine years.  Samuel Meek, son of the above, and grandfather of our subject, was born in Pennsylvania in 1765 and married Elizabeth Nichols.  Mrs. Meek's grandfather, Christopher Beltz, and his wife, Catherine (Beck), were both born in Pennsylvania; he died in about 1860, but she survived him several years."

With this sketch, census and newspaper records, we can create a timeline for David Cooper Meek.  He would have moved to Pennsylvania with his family about 1827 and then back to Columbiana County in 1834.  He remained at home with his parents until about 1846 when he left for Ohio and eventually, California, in 1848.  Those were the gold rush days, and it appeared that David (and possibly at least one other brother) were forty-niners, chasing gold in California.

David led a miner's life until 1852 when he returned home, perhaps buying or expanding his land ownership in Ohio, before heading back to California where he remained until 1863.  The sketch said he had some success as a miner, perhaps enough to help develop his farm ground in Defiance County where he settled upon his return.

He was 47 years old before he married Nancy Jane Beltz on June 22, 1871.  Nancy was about thirty years younger than David...quite an age difference!  In the 1880 census, David was reported as 56 and Nancy as 27.  On April 5, 1872, their first child was born - Eva - but she died on October 24, 1872, at six months old. Soon Nancy was pregnant with child #2 - Clement Orlando Meek - born July 23, 1873. He enjoyed his parents' doting for nine years until one more child was born. Their last child was named after his father, David C. Meek, born December 22, 1885 when his father was about 60 years old.

In 1895, little Davey Meek found himself in a predicament with a gun, one so serious that another boy, Howard Henry Barrows, lost his life. 
 It is not know if this Harold Barrows was relation to Lillie Barrows, wife of Clement Meek.

In the 1900 census of Hicksville Township, David Cooper Meek was head of the household at age 76, married for 29 years and still farming, owning his farm free and clear.  Nancy was 46 (born December 1853) and had three children, of which only one was living.  Clement O. Meek died on August 31, 1899, leaving a widow, Lillie H. (Barrows) and a child, Laura Beatrice, 2, who were living with David and Nancy in 1900.  Lillie was only 20 years old and a widow.  Completing the family was their youngest son, David C., 14, working as a farm laborer, probably his father's right hand man.

Clement, although in poor health for awhile, died quite suddenly.

 It was just one year later that David Cooper Meek died, leaving his wife and a 15 year old son to make their way.  He died on August 10, 1901 of some kind of paralysis at the age of 77.  His will was entered into probate on September 3, 1901, and it left Nancy the right to all his property and goods for the rest of her natural life, after which David C. Meek, was to inherit.  Fifty dollars was left to  each of the children of Clement Meek when they became 18,  He stated that he had already given a part of his estate to Clement previously.  The will had been written on December 23, 1899, so David was not aware of the number of living children Clement would have.
Six Corners Cemetery, Hicksville Township, Defiance County, OH


Nancy Beltz Meek lived on until May 29, 1947.  David C. married Mable Gertrude Tustison from Hicksville and they had two sons, Wendell and Maurice.  David died the year after his mother, on April 6, 1948.